Sacred Places – Gavin and Yvonne’s Archive – Wicca.org

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If you are like us, by this time of year you’ve reached the saturation point with all the gasping of conventional religionists about “sacred” spots and “sacred” places. The recent BS about a house found in “Nazareth” is just the latest gasper, one more example of a manufactured tourist trap. It’s no better than the “graves” of Arthur and Guinevere, “discovered” when a big ol’ church had a fire and decided to bait a lot of tourist/pilgrim revenue. Don’t lose sight of the fact that Nazareth itself is an invented town; no such town existed in What’s-His-Name’s purported time.
Anyway, the question now is : What spot is sacred to you, and why aren’t you (and we, for that matter) putting pictures and descriptions of pagan/Wiccan sacred sites on the web? There are hundreds of thousands of them. The Wells (Red and White) of Glastonbury, the Bend of the River Boyne, the tombs of Brittany … everywhere you go there are places eligible to be called sacred. In fact, of course, the tree in your front yard or the one growing alone in the forest is also part of a sacred place. The very grass and foliage all make up the Sacred.
Think only of Britain’s New Forest, site of the Rufus Stone; Glastonbury; the whole peninsula of Cornwall. The tombs of France; Carnac with its stone alignments; Gavr’inis; Beziers and Montsegur, where Cathars died in their thousands for their spiritual beliefs. In North America Yucca Mountain and Illinois’ Cahokia, just for starters. Peru’s Machu Picchu and the Nazca Lines.
What occurs to you? Where have you felt connected to the spirituality of times past?
Recently we saw the film Avatar and were pleased at the tremendously powerful message it portrayed from beginning to end, of a people who held their natural environment sacred in every way. How vividly their mindset contrasted with that of those who would destroy the planet to get at deposits of an important metal, here called unobtainium.
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As you know, we Frosts are continually criticized for our honest and basic real-world attitude to gender relationships. Of course the majority of people can think of “deviant” relationships only in terms of the pejoratives applied to sex by the culture in which we life. How about considering that those relationships should be sacred and that sex done to produce children should in fact be a sacrament carefully thought out and reverently performed?
Identify for us your favorite sacred sites. We’d love to learn about them.
Blessed be those who hold themselves open to the sacred. Gavin and Yvonne

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